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What is the title of the application? Who developed it?


Google Lit Trips was created by Jerome Burg. Burg started this site while teaching at Granada High School, in Livermore California. He had hoped to help get his students get more invovled in the travels which took place within the literature discussed in his classroom. His efforts were well rewarded as the Asia Society has named Google Lit Trips as a co-winner of the 2008 Goldman Sachs Foundation Prize for Excellence in International Education for Media and Technology.

Google Lit Trips is conducted through Google Earth. "Google Earth allows the addition of place markers to indicate locations along the route and to include such enhancements as appropriate images, relevant website links, and thought provoking discussion starters."  Google Lit Trip uses Google Earth to take students on virtual literature tours.  Tours are focused on individual books such as Kite Runner and The Odyssey.  The viewer can download pre-made maps and even create their own Lit Trip by using Google Earth.  This can be done in three easy steps: (1) Adding a few points on your Google map, (2) Connecting the points using lines and/or arrows, and (3) Going on a virtual tour of the Earth.

Google Lit Trips, although new on the educational stage, has already been highly praised and is being used by many teachers to help their students better understand literature.

The orange wont be here on the final draft.

  Jerome Burg started Google lit trips.  He created this site to help his students get more involved into literature travels.  Jerome Burg started this site when he was teaching at Granada High School, in Livermore, California.      http://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literaturehttp://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literature    
Google lit trips is done through goole earth.  "Google Earth allows the addition of place markers to indicate locations along the route and to include such enhancements as appropriate images, relevant website links, and thought provoking discussion starters."   http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/WebinarSeries/20082009Webinars/Google_LitTrips.htmhttp://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/WebinarSeries/20082009Webinars/Google_LitTrips.htm     
 Teachers can we "better social studies classes by integrateing their content with fiction and non-fiction sources. One of the best ways to do that is by using Google Lit Trips. Google Lit Trips focuses on the idea of creating Google Earth Tours based on historical fiction, novels and non-fiction.   http://historytech.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/tip-of-the-week-google-lit-trips/http://historytech.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/tip-of-the-week-google-lit-trips/  

If this section later turns into a "background information" page, I thought this might be useful. We could include any other awards that we find as well.

"We are proud to announce that the Asia Society has named Google Lit Trips as a co-winner of the 2008 Goldman Sachs Foundation Prize for Excellence in International Education for Media and Technology."

http://www.googlelittrips.org/

What is the purpose of the application (that is, what does it do)?


-uses google earth & KMZ files

-takes different characters jouneys and displays a virtual tour of where they are going. at the same time, inserting information at the characters stops along the way

- shows that characters are interacting with real history in real places-- helps students make connection from real life to story

-allows more interaction between students and characters instead of using a just a worksheet

-podcast-- introduction/description of what went through creators minds when they were making the trip

Google Lit Trips combines 21st century literacy skills with 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th century literature.  It places students in the middle of a story and with Google Earth they are able to follow a character (or characters) virtually through a tale.  Jerome has some great ideas for including essential reading questions, thinking-about-the-story conversation starters, and vocabulary words in each placemark.  He links vocabulary words to pictures.  This forces students to process the picture and develop their own definition.  http://www.joewoodonline.com/google-lit-trips-ilc/

In recent years, literary maps have become very popular in classrooms, especially in secondary education English classes. A literary map is defined as "a map showing specific locations assocaiated with certain pieces of literature, such as, the life of an author, or places that occur in a piece of literature. For example: A literary map may show the travels of Edgar Allen Poe throughout his life or the travels of the storytellers in The Canterbery Tales. Literary maps originally started as poster boards or drawings created by teachers or students, but have recently been taken to another level through online programs, such as Google Lit Trips, which uses satellite maps from Google Earth to plot characters travels. This gives students a very strong visual aid that allows them to better understand the books they are reading. Google Lit Trips can be especially helpful if students are reading a book that takes place in a foreign country.

"Google Lit Trips combines 21st century literacy skills with 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th century literature." Students and teachers have the opportunity to travel with the characters in a particular piece of literature through their adventures and journeys. Also, many of the lit trips are accompanied by "essential reading questions, thinking-about-the-story conversation starters, and vocabulary words that are linked to pictures," most of which have been added by Jerome Burg.

 http://www.joewoodonline.com/google-lit-trips-ilc/

Google Lit Trips is a great tool in helping students actually interact with characters from literary works. Unlike prior generations, where most of what students did was on a piece of paper, students now can actually plot a characters journey on a computer. Google lit trips allows students to learn some history and geography as well as just learning Literature. By studying a work such as Homer's The Odyssey students can learn many of the major countries and islands of the Mediterranian as well as learning about Greek mythology. Google Lit Trips can be a great source for teachers everywhere.

http://ncteinbox.blogspot.com/2008/07/google-lit-trips-literary-maps-meet.html

The goal of the website is to integrate lesson plans created by students and teachers, not just by the website creators themselves. Jerome Burg, the website creator, is very open to communicating with people who are willing to create Google Lit Trips. By simply emailing him (or the website), you can find out if someone else is already working on a piece of literature that you are interested in or interested in creating. It is also possible for information to be provided in order for you to collaborate with someone else who is already working on a literature trip. Overall the site and Burg are very helpful in helping those who want to help.

http://web.mac.com/jburg/GoogleLit/FAQs.html

How does it work? Briefly, what does one have to do to start using it?


 The major question when experimenting with a site like Google Lit Trips is what do I have to do and does it cost anything to me or my students. Well it is very easy to get started and no, it will not cost anything to get started. The first thing you have to do when accessing Google Lit Trips is download Google Earth. This is a free and easy download and can be obtained at . After you have Google Earth downloaded you should be able to go to Lit Trips and select a literary work for the age group you are directing your attention to. Just click on the age group at the top of the page and you will find a list of all the lit trips available to that group. This will allow you to download any work on the page and open it as a kmz in Google Earth. Now you can begin your trip. (This might be kinda weak. Don't be afraid to add to or polish it.)

How is it related to other applications (that is, can it be used in conjunction with other applications)?


  •  Google Lit Trips is run alongside with Google Earth.
    • Google Earth is software that alllows a sattelite view of any location in the world.
      • Google Earth is available in 39 different languages. So not just applicable to certain cultures.
  • Podcast is another important application that is included with Google Lit Trips.
    • It's a form of blogging and leaving comments to other possible viewers on the internet. (http://www.entrepreneurs-journey.com/230/what-is-a-podcast/)
    • Record something about the book, post it on the GLT's website to relay more information on the novel while the viewer is following the map. A more well rounded activity.
      • Have to install a quicktime player for any use of podcasts.
  • A similar site to Google Lit Trips that uses the same applications are www.openbible.info/geo/
    • Just like classic literature, books of the Bible are viewed
    • This could be good in a religion class or sunday school
      • Not all the books are included, some have no places mentioned or able to visit
      • some interesting features to this site is they also mark ancient bodies of water mentioned in the bible. And can show overlays of ancient maps over modern ones, which is an awesome feature for any GLT that involves on older book like the odyssey for example. (www.openbible.info/geo/)

http://www.openbible.info/geo/

http://www.openbible.info/geo/

 As you've probably already guessed Google Lit Trips is by itself inoperable. To be able to use Google Lit Trips effectively you have to also have the Google Earth application. This is very similar to needed some sort of flash player for YouTube. The files that can be downloaded on the Google Lit Trips site are KMZ files which can only be opened via Google Earth. Google Earth, however, is not the only application used in Google Lit Trips. Another application that has been implemented is Podcast. As many of you may know from college lecture courses Podcast is where someone, in most cases a professor, records himself/herself and posts the recording so that it can be listened to or even downloaded on an IPod. This feature is used by teachers creating lit trips to comment on the path of the characters or author that they are creating the lit trip around. This can be very helpful to students that may learn better by hearing as opposed to seeing.

There are also similar websites to Google Lit Trips that use some of the same applications. One popular one in www.openbible.info/geo/. This website does basically the same thing as Google Lit Trips except instead of focusing on classical literature it focuses on books of the Bible. This can be a very useful tool in both church study groups as well as Sunday School lessons. A cool feature about Openbible is that it shows overlays fo ancient maps over modern ones, which could also be used in Google Lit Trips on older works of literature such as The Odyssey.

What are some unique ways of using this application?


  •  Teachers can create their own Google Lit Trip (http://thehurt.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/google-lit-trips/)
    • Endless possibilites to what kind of novels can be assigned in class
    • Students can do their own research to create application
      • Even better understanding of material
    • Social Studies teachers could use it for textbook
      • Great way to bring history to life when students see it
        • For example gives students a better idea of how far an army or person may have traveled. An interesting look at distance versus a stagnant map.
    • Any teacher who wants to show something more real to life than just pictures
    • Can create Google Lit Trips to fit across the entire class curriculum.
    • Uses outside of education: Students differentiate between things that happened long ago and things that happened yesterday. Trace the history of a family through the use of primary and secondary sources, including artifacts, photographs, interviews, and Students demonstrate map skills by describing the absolute and relative locations of people, places, and environments. Locate on a map where their ancestors live(d), telling when the family moved to the local community and how and why they made the trip. documents.http://ctap10.org/gfeportal
    • it is important to also note that Google Earth is constantly updating its resources and therefore adding new possibilities for Google Lit Trips.  The Sky layer now makes it possible to consider titles set 'anywhere' in the known universe! And after all there are at least a couple of resources in Sky that overlay the ancient constellations, it is possible to even consider the possibility of employing the Google Lit Trip concept to ancient mythology, Google Mars, Google and Ocean now open several additional possibilities to Google Lit Trips.   www.wemtaonline.org/dwcenterprise/school1000292/FCK/File/Conference%202009/Burg_Building%20Lit%20Trips_Basics

 Google Lit Trips can be used in several unique ways. Teachers can use Google Lit Trips to create their own virtual tour of their favorite book. Google lit trips is not just useful for English teachers. Spanish teachers and history teachers could also be aided by Google Lit Trips. Spanish teachers could use it to create maps on such classic novels like Don Quixote or El Campeador. History teachers, as you could imagine, could use Google Lit Trips to compliment the text book by showing them the path of say Alexander the Great during his conquest of Asia. Google Lit Trips can be used by teachers of almost any subject.

Google Lit Trips can also be used by students as well. If a student is reading a literary work and is confused they could be aided by both the podcast and the trips on the site. It could also be used by the students to create their own Google Lit Trip. In the end Google Lit Trips can be used by students and teachers alike to increase their understanding of classic literary works.

Even when not used within a classroom setting, Google Lit Trips can be used a a valuable resource. Families or individuals could use the program to map out their ancestry and trace the routes that previous generations took in gradually moving to their present-day location. The map used with this program could correspond with artifacts, photographs, and interviews in some sort of collection, and it could potentially be used by companies or organizations whose focus is geneology. Similarly, a company that originated in a foreign country could use Google Lit Trips to follow the expansion of their business in the development of new buildings or headquarters or the outreach of customers.

As Google Earth is expanding its capabilites, Google Lit Trips can be used in new ways as well. Possibilites are becoming nearly endless, since Google Earth now has a new Sky Layer, which uses satellite images of the universe rather than just the planet Earth. This allows for a new exploration of literature that discusses constellations and others planets; also, this could be key to students grasping the concept of ancient mythology.

How could the application be used within an educational/learning situation? For example, generate multiple content area lesson plans foreach of the following areas: Elementary, Secondary, Post-secondary, and Business/Industry


-          Creates an image in the mind of the reader

-          Children compared to adults, don't have a lot of personal experience to form mental pictures while reading a story. This helps.

                    o   See what the characters in the story saw.

-          Pleasant and lasting educational and literary experience.

( http://beyondchalk.com/blog/general/google-lit-trips/  written by Callie Whelan)

-          Great way for students to use technology in the classroom.

-          Interactive way for students to connect with story.

(by Suzie Boss http://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literature)

-          Can set fictional novels to real classes.

                        o   One class used the Golden Compass.

(by Ginny Hutcheson,  http://cnx.org/content/m19821/latest/)

Another idea I had is that we could also outline a whole curriculum in Google Earth. Instead of one book, we look at all of the books we study over the course of a year (i.e. The Whale Rider, Greek Mythology, The Odyssey, Romeo & Juliet, etc.) and all the places those books take us. http://thehurt.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/google-lit-trips/#comments 

Google Lit Trips can be used to create lesson plans for all ages. An early education teacher could use the site to help her students learn both geography and literature while the CEO of a large company could use it to show his employees good business ventures. It may be difficult though for early elementary teachers and CEO's to use Google Lit Trips at their level because there are not a lot of books tailored to those groups that contain a prominent geographical setting. Google Lit Trips can be best implemented in high school and colleg because of the type of books used in those areas. When students enter high school teachers start assigning books such as Beowulf, The Odyssey, The Canterbery Tales, Don Quixote and other books where the geographical position of the character is important in the plot of the book. Overall Google Lit Trips is a very good teaching aid for anybody, but is very effective in high school classrooms.

Also, a teacher can use Google Lit Trips on a wider scale, especially if there is not much travel or movement in one particular work of literature. This program could be used over the course of an entire year so that students can see the location of one story in terms of both their personal locations and in terms of characters' locations in books that they have previously read within the classroom. Developed over time, this larger map with various destinations can assist students in understanding the scope of geographic knowledge that they have acquired.

What are some examples (e.g., web sites) of it being used to illustrate its current educational value or potential value?


  •  This application has already been used, as demonstrated by the English class that used Google Lit Trips to enhance their lesson over The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman.
  • This application has been used in social studies classes to allow students to view places and events from the past; for example students have used this to study Ancient Egypt.
  • The application has also been invaluable to social studies teachers seeking to teach their students about geography.
  • In terms of using this technology for the purpose of a Bible study, it has proven to be quite effective. This web site boasts of being able to detail the location of every location mentioned in the Bible. Not only does it provide a general map of main locations, it also breaks the Bible down by book and chapter to go further in depth. This can serve to greatly enhance a Bible study.
  • Books that have already been enhanced by Google Lit Trips
  • This technology can also be used for adult education, i.e. GED classes, because adults learn better by being able to place acquired knowledge with a previous experience, such as through geography
  •  Many people are not yet familiar with the application, but once it becomes more well-known it will become more commonly used, and will serve to enhance learning experiences around the world!

 Google Lit Trips is finding it's way into classrooms and learning environments everywhere. It's been used from primary education to the workplace and even in GED classes. It can be a huge advantage for adults because many adults often learn better if they can actually see what is happening and put a picture or place with what they are studying. Lit trips is also becoming almost as instrumental in the history class as it has in the English class. Not only is it being used to show the path of characters and authors but it is also being used by history teachers to study ancient civilazations such as Egypt, Rome, Greece, and Persia. Google Lit Trips appears to be on the rise and there are already several very good works of literature that have been transformed into lit trips.  Just a few of these works include  Night by Elie Wiesel, My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier, By the Great Horn Spoon by Sid Fleishman, and The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. Google Lit Trips is a strong teaching aid that many more teachers worldwide should consider using.

For those teams with international partners, how is the application used in their countries? Are there unique features of the application that may be more relevant to those outside of the US?


  • Our friend from Australia, Emma Conway, has provided us with some information about how this application is (or can be) used in Australia.
  • She believes can be used more widely in adult education courses to assist non-traditional students by adding relevancy to their lessons. She also believes it will stimulate discussion, and allow them to share previous experiences and encourage further research into new areas of study.
  •  In the teaching of immigrants or non-english speaking Australians Google Lit Trips has the potential to assist students overcoming the barriers presented by trying to relate to a new culture. Teachers attempting to deliver English lessons based on Australian culture or geography while appearing to 'kill two birds with one stone' have the potential to loose students in the cultural references. By choosing literacy that is based in the students original countries or regions, students have the potential to be more comfortable with the stories location and more able to focus on the function of reading. Adding Google Lit Trips to a classroom such as this presents another tool for the teacher to use to engage students in the function of language. Discussing translations, similarities between previous homes and features of Australia could also begin to break down cultural barriers and allow students to relate more closely with their new environment.
  • In this environment, student built Lit Trips based on Australian literture have to potential to assist new Australians in building a picture of where they are in the world. By researching Australian culture, icons and significat features a mirriad of subjects can be incorporated into the Lit Trip so as to take full advantage of the applications potential.
  • Distance Learning in Australia as in the US involves connecting students who are separated by vast distances. Ross Mason, Head of Online teaching and Learning for the School of Isolated and Distance Education in Western Australia believes the use of Web 2.0 applications such as Google Lit Trips is an appropriate method of firstly connecting and engaging students through the Web, and secondly a way to engage students in remote communites with the world outside their immediate location. By using Lit Trips teachers can introduce new geographical locations and features to students in a way that keeps them engaged and motivated. Ross suggested that the use of an application such as Google Lit Trips would not be writen into a syllibus or curriculum but rather would be introduced to teachers through information and resource sharing sites such as EDNA http://www.edna.edu.au/ User groups such as EDNA provide a space for peer review of new applications and resurces and facilitate the spread of knowledge throughout the educational community. telecon Emma Conway/Ross Mason 2 April 09
  • Google Lit Trips can be used by different cultures to highlight differences or similarities through the use of stories. A Lit Trip already in existnace based on the book Possun Magic by Mem Fox explains to students differnet cultural icons of Australia as the story travels around the country. This principle could be used by teachers and students in other countries to highlight or explain significant cultural icons, landmarks or features of the US or any other counrty where an appropriate story of travel exists.
  • She says that she will provide more information, so look for updates!

In the teaching of immigrants or non-english speaking Australians Google Lit Trips has the potential to assist students overcoming the barriers presented by trying to relate to a new culture. Teachers attempting to deliver English lessons based on Australian culture or geography while appearing to 'kill two birds with one stone' have the potential to loose students in the cultural references. By choosing literacy that is based in the students original countries or regions, students have the potential to be more comfortable with the stories location and more able to focus on the function of reading. Adding Google Lit Trips to a classroom such as this presents another tool for the teacher to use to engage students in the function of language. Discussing translations, similarities between previous homes and features of Australia could also begin to break down cultural barriers and allow students to relate more closely with their new environment. In this environment, student built Lit Trips based on Australian literture have to potential to assist new Australians in building a picture of where they are in the world. By researching Australian culture, icons and significat features a mirriad of subjects can be incorporated into the Lit Trip so as to take full advantage of the applications potential.

Google Lit Trips can be used in distance education in Australia much the way it is used in the United States. Distance Learning in Australia as in the US involves connecting students who are separated by vast distances. Ross Mason, Head of Online teaching and Learning for the School of Isolated and Distance Education in Western Australia believes the use of Web 2.0 applications such as Google Lit Trips is an appropriate method of firstly connecting and engaging students through the Web, and secondly a way to engage students in remote communites with the world outside their immediate location. By using Lit Trips teachers can introduce new geographical locations and features to students in a way that keeps them engaged and motivated. Ross suggested that the use of an application such as Google Lit Trips would not be writen into a syllibus or curriculum but rather would be introduced to teachers through information and resource sharing sites such as EDNA http://www.edna.edu.au/ User groups such as EDNA provide a space for peer review of new applications and resurces and facilitate the spread of knowledge throughout the educational community.

Google Lit Trips can be used by different cultures to highlight differences or similarities through the use of stories. A Lit Trip already in existnace based on the book Possun Magic by Mem Fox explains to students differnet cultural icons of Australia as the story travels around the country. This principle could be used by teachers and students in other countries to highlight or explain significant cultural icons, landmarks or features of the US or any other counrty where an appropriate story of travel exists.

 References

----

  1. http://www.googlelittrips.org/
  2. http://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literature
  3. http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/WebinarSeries/20082009Webinars/Google_LitTrips.htm
  4. http://historytech.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/tip-of-the-week-google-lit-trips/
  5. http://ncteinbox.blogspot.com/2008/07/google-lit-trips-literary-maps-meet.html
  6. http://web.mac.com/jburg/GoogleLit/FAQs.html
  7. http://www.wemtaonline.org/dwcenterprise/school1000292/FCK/File/Conference%202009/Burg_The%20Basics%20of%20Viewing%20a%20Google%20Lit%20Trip.pdf
  8. http://www.homeschoolbuyersco-op.org/free-curriculum-details/details-1041.html
  9. http://www.entrepreneurs-journey.com/230/what-is-a-podcast/
  10. http://www.openbible.info/geo/
  11. http://thehurt.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/google-lit-trips/
  12. http://beyondchalk.com/blog/general/google-lit-trips/
  13. http://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literature
  14. http://cnx.org/content/m19821/latest/
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2 Comments

  1. This is what I could find on the International application of lit trips.  Basically it has the same application around the world.  (i think i might be posting it in the wrong place though, still working out this whole wiki thing)

    Adults draw on their life experiences to visualise an image or setting, however children find this difficult, lit trips aids a student's comprehension by providing the visual setting of a novel making the storyline more relevant to the student.  http://beyondchalk.com/blog/general/google-lit-trips/


    I also found this information about an author by the name of Christoph Brenda who created a geo-novel based on his travels through Senegal (Africa) called  ' Senghor on the Rocks'.

    "For me, the project always has been related to a map in a certain sense. Only that it wasn't hi tech, online satellite imagery but the rather worn out paper map I had carried with me throughout all my time in Africa," says Benda who wrote the book between 2002 and 2005.

    "We wanted to add something to the story that helps readers - especially as the story is set in an unfamiliar environment - to envision the mood of the story without illustrating it," says Ledermann.

    "The satellite images provided by Google Maps do not constrain the reader's imagination but are capable of actually triggering imagination by giving a rough impression without too much detail."

    Benda says that as a newbie author, the project to geo-annotate Senghor on the Rocks appealed to him because of the experimental nature of the format.

    "I am pretty sure that we met a much wider audience - in terms of media coverage as well as readers or at least interested people - than we ever could have found with a 'classical' print publication," he says. http://www.smh.com.au/news/technology/web/google-maps-hack-turns-book-into-geonovel/2008/11/25/1227491538136.html

    Google Lit Trips combines 21st century literacy skills with 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th century literature.  It places students in the middle of a story and with Google Earth they are able to follow a character (or characters) virtually through a tale.  Jerome has some great ideas for including essential reading questions, thinking-about-the-story conversation starters, and vocabulary words in each placemark.  He links vocabulary words to pictures.  This forces students to process the picture and develop their own definition.  http://www.joewoodonline.com/google-lit-trips-ilc/

    Another idea I had is that we could also outline a whole curriculum in Google Earth. Instead of one book, we look at all of the books we study over the course of a year (i.e. The Whale Rider, Greek Mythology, The Odyssey, Romeo & Juliet, etc.) and all the places those books take us. http://thehurt.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/google-lit-trips/#comments

    it is important to also note that Google Earth is constantly updating its resources and therefore adding new possibilities for Google Lit Trips.  The Sky layer now makes it possible to consider titles set 'anywhere' in the known universe! And after all there are at least a couple of resources in Sky that overlay the ancient constellations, it is possible to even consider the possibility of employing the Google Lit Trip concept to ancient mythology, Google Mars, Google and Ocean now open several additional possibilities to Google Lit Trips.   www.wemtaonline.org/dwcenterprise/school1000292/FCK/File/Conference%202009/Burg_Building%20Lit%20Trips_Basics

    Students differentiate between things that happened long ago and things that happened yesterday. Trace the history of a family through the use of primary and secondary sources, including artifacts, photographs, interviews, and Students demonstrate map skills by describing the absolute and relative locations of people, places, and environments. Locate on a map where their ancestors live(d), telling when the family moved to the local community and how and why they made the trip. documents.http://ctap10.org/gfeportal

     

  2. Unknown User (lmitchel)

    Hey Africa,

    This is a good start. It's okay that you posted it here...that's actually the best place for it for now because we can just copy and paste the research into different areas and write them into paragraph form. I actually used many of your ideas, but didn't necessarily put them in the International Use section. Some of them I thought fit better under different headers so I put them there instead. Which is great! Because now we're really expanding on what we've got. (smile)