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  • How could this be used in an educational setting?
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  • Google lit trips make a good effect in educational setting because they create an image for the mind of the reader. Children have little experience to pull from their imagination to form mental pictures while they are reading a story. By using Google Lit Trips, they can actually see what the characters in the story saw. It can create a  more pleasant and lasting literature experience. ( http://beyondchalk.com/blog/general/google-lit-trips/  written by Callie Whelan)
  • Google Lit Trips is a great way for students to use technology in the classroom. Google Earth is an awesome application that uses satellites to view any place in the world. By following the travels from stories on Google Earth it is a highly interactive way for students to connect to the story they are reading or discussing in the class. (by Suzie Boss http://www.edutopia.org/google-lit-trips-virtual-literature)
  • Another cool things students are doing with Google Lit Trips is setting fictional novels to real places. One class for example used the story The Golden Compass, students found real locations to follow the story with. (by Ginny Hutcheson,  http://cnx.org/content/m19821/latest/)
  • Google Lit Trips makes an awesome interactive activity for students to get more out of the books they are reading. Being able to follow the story and the characters by looking at maps and images inserted into the maps is a great way for the plot to really come alive and be made more enjoyable by the students. It can be used in a college setting all the way down to fourth or fifth grades in elementary schools. It also can be useful in integrating technology into the classroom. Many blogs have referenced it being a " cross-curricular connections, literary exploration, and 21st century skills."( http://ncte2008.ning.com/forum/topics/2256925:Topic:7821 Jill Castekon September 25, 2008)

Krista Mehl

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  1. Unknown User (kmehl)

    Researched by Krista Mehl